Crispy focaccia

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Focaccia, perhaps THE Italian flat bread, comes in so many different variations, from plain focaccia Genovese to regional versions with the richest toppings. You can try this easy traditional summer recipe, all you need is a little time. Plan to make it when you are at home for a few hours, like on a Sunday afternoon. This focaccia makes for great party food or the perfect family meal.

Watch video: https://vimeo.com/222813300

Yield: Makes a large tray
Prep time: 15 minutes
Cooking and leavening time: 3 hours

Ingredients
Mother yeast, 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) – Lievito Madre by Molino Rossetto
00 flour, 1 pound (500g)
Luke warm water, 300ml
Sea salt, 2 ½ tablespoons
Sugar, 1 tablespoon
Extra virgin olive oil, about 7 tablespoons
Datterino or cherry tomatoes, 1 pound
Mozzarella di bufala, ½ pound (regular mozzarella works just fine)
Capers in sea salt, 2 tablespoons
Anchovies in oil, about 10 fillets
Fresh basil, 1 bunch
Fresh arugula, 1 bunch

Utensils Needed
Oven, oven tray, electric mixer or bowl, tea towel, rimmed baking sheet, rolling pin

Method
Place mother yeast, flour, sugar, salt, water and 2 tablespoons EVOO in the electric mixer or in a bowl and mix or knead until smooth and uniform. Shape into a ball, grease the surface with a little EVOO (1 tablespoon) a cover the bowl with a damp clean tea towel and let sit for about 2 hours, or until the dough has roughly doubled.

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Preheat oven to 375F. Grease the tray with a little oil (1 tablespoon). Now knead lightly and roll with rolling pin and gently press into the baking tray, flatten to fill whole tray and obtain a sheet no higher than 1 inch. If the dough is too sticky use some flour on your hands. Drizzle the whole surface with the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil and 2 tablespoons of water. Chop the tomatoes in half. Garnish the whole surface of the focaccia with tomatoes, torn mozzarella, capers and anchovies.

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Bake for about 30 to 40 minutes, until the crust looks crispy and light brown. Cover with basil and arugula leaves and sprinkle with some EVOO and sea salt.

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Buon appetito!

Wild cherry and rose petal jam

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If you are lucky enough to have some wild cherry trees near you, hurry up and make the most of their short season! Wild cherries are smaller and lighter in color than classical ones, and have a more acidic flavor. This great acidity works perfectly with sweetness, giving a tart note to recipes like pies, crumbles, pancakes or strudels. Here is a recipe for a delicate jam, great to pair with pancakes, toast and fresh goat’s milk cheeses.

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Recipe:
2 pounds wild cherries
1 pound sugar
1 teaspoon dried rose petals
1 apple peel

Method:
Wash and pit the cherries. Add to a pot with all other ingredients and cook for about 40 minutes. The apple peel is essential to get a nice dense texture as it’s rich in pectine. Rose petals will give a delicate touch, you could use vanilla or mint instead. Sterilise your jars and pour in the jam whilst still boiling hot. If the process is done correctly, the jam will last for 6 months at least. This recipe can be applied to other fruit as well, lowering a little the sugar content. Wild cherries are tart and need an extra push of sweetness, but say you were using ripe sweet peaches, you wouldn’t need as much.

Wrap your jars nicely, store & enjoy during the months when wild cherries are not in season or give away as presents.

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Pecorino Love

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Pecorino in Italian translates to “of sheep” indicating the milk used to produce the cheese. It’s a staple across Italy, particularly on the islands and in southern regions. It used to be one of ancient Rome’s most praised foods, it’s consumption recommended to fight tiredness.

Compared to cow and goat, sheep’s milk is far richer in fat and protein – nearly double the quantities – which gives the cheese its creaminess and density. A favorite in Sicily is sheep’s milk ricotta, essential in many traditional dishes such as Cannoli and Cassata.

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When it comes to hard cheeses, the most popular ones are Pecorino Toscano, Pecorino Romano and Pecorino Sardo. If aged under 40 days they are classified as fresh pecorino. In Sardinia, the DOP version is aged for only 2 months while for Pecorino Toscano the ageing period raises to 4 months and to 5 for Romano. All three cheeses have their own set of production rules in order to be classified as the DOP hard cheese we are all familiar with. Try using pecorino as part of a cheese board, served with raw fresh fava beans or peas. It is a custom to use grated Pecorino Romano on pasta instead of Parmigiano Reggiano, and on very popular dishes such as Cacio e Pepe, Amatriciana and Carbonara.

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In recent years a unique native grape variety has come back to life after risking extinction: Pecorino! Yes, there’s a wine bearing the same name of the cheese. Popular in the central regions of Abruzzo Marche, Umbria and Lazio, many think the name comes from the fact the wine has similar flavors to the cheese though the origin is probably another. Apparently sheep would pass by this  varietal’s vineyards on their way to the mountains during the summer “transumanza”, and would love snacking on the fresh fruit from the vines.

So why not plan for a pecorino themed night? Pecorino cheese and pecorino wine!

 

Grissini

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Most Italian restaurant tables always feature grissini (breadsticks), a very traditional crunchy bite to munch on whilst going through the menu. Originally from the Piedmont region, they were invented in the 17th century as a remedy to Duke Vittorio Amedeo II of Savoia’s digestion problems. Struggling to come up with solutions, his doctor asked the court’s bread maker to come up with a crunchy and very light bread variety. The baker took a piece of the bread dough commonly used for “ghersa”,  a typical bread from Turin, shaping into thin crispy strips thus eliminating the soft inside part which was the hardest one to digest. For the first time the Duke could comfortably eat bread, and the legend goes that thanks to this recipe he recovered his health entirely, becoming the first King of the Savoia dynasty just a few years later. Some say the ghost of the Duke still roams the halls of his castle wielding a grissino.

Since then they boomed in popularity, even becoming a favorite of Napoleon who established a dedicated postal service to have them delivered to France. They come in all shapes and flavors, and are quite easy to make at home. So dive into the following recipe of this Piedmontese classic:

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Grissini alle nocciole
Breadsticks with hazelnuts
 
Ingredients
Yeast, 1 ounce (2 tablespoons)
“00” flour, 2 pounds (1 kg)
Luke warm water, 2 ½ cups
Sea salt, 2 tablespoons
Sugar, 1 tablespoon
Extra virgin olive oil, 3 tablespoon
Hazelnuts, 1 pound

Method
Place the yeast, sugar and a splash of warm water in a bowl. Let it sit for a few minutes and let it do its thing. Add all ingredients in the bowl and mix (electric mixer) or kneed until smooth  and  uniform.  Cover  the  bowl  with  a  damp  clean  tea  towel  and  let sit  for  about  2 hours, or until the dough has roughly doubled in size. With a rolling pin, roll the dough into a 1” thick rectangle. With a knife cut it into 1” thick strips. Place on an oven tray with greaseproof paper.
Bake at 375°F for about 15 minutes or until light brown.
Try serving wrapped with prosciutto crudo.

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Buon appetito!