It’s Aperitivo time!

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Aperitivo is a wonderful custom, enjoyed and practiced all across Italy. It’s the perfect way to leave behind a long day and relax having a glass of wine or a light cocktail in good company. The word  defines the act as well as the actual drink – cocktails such as Negroni and Spritz, thought to entice your appetite. Aperitivo is often accompanied by snacks ranging from cheese and charcuterie to more elaborated finger food, such as tartine (similar to bruschetta), polpette (meatballs), fried zucchini flowers stuffed with mozzarella and anchovies or seafood tartare. Just a few examples of the colorful range of delicacies you can enjoy.

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It’s origin is linked to the city Torino, where the first Vermouths (fortified wines) were prodcuced, think Carpani, Martini, Cinzano. Today aperitivo rhymes with Milano – the town flows with different kinds of bar concepts for all tastes.

The choice can be overwhelming –  here are a few tips on places to visit on a short trip:
If wine is what you are looking for, hands down this hidden cellar is a must http://www.alcortile.com/. Getting to it is an adventure  – you need to ring the bell, enter a gate, walk through a private alley and down the stairs to this ancient cellar, don’t get it mixed up with the upstairs restaurant and cooking school.
The most incredible and eclectic cocktail bar of all must be Nottingham Forest http://www.nottingham-forest.com/ , where you can sip your libations out of an All Star shoe cup, or order an extravagant cocktail containing pure gold and real pearls or experiment new frontiers of texture and aesthetics with molecular mixology.
In the fancy area of Brera you can savour an fine Japanese style aperitivo at Sushi B http://www.sushi-b.it/ and Lacerba’s http://www.lacerba.it/  charming and futuristic decor makes for a  memorable experience.

Cin cin!

Sicilian Orange and Fennel Salad

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Fennel peak season calls for a one-of-a-kind Mediterranean recipe.  Healthy, fresh, crunchy, delicious and very simple to prepare. It makes for a great light lunch or the perfect side to a roast chicken or fish.

Italians love fennel and use it in a variety of dishes, making the best of all its parts, from the bulb to the flowers and seeds. And it isn’t just a matter of taste. Think of Finocchiona, the traditional Tuscan salami: the fennel seeds help preserve it while adding their characteristic flavour.  Its is rich in vitamin C, fibers and several essential nutrients for our diet. It also has unusual phytonutrients that give it ample antioxidant and immune-boosting capabilities.

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Ingredients:
3 large fennels (try and find them with the green tips)
3 oranges
2 spring onions
2 tbsp Capers in salt
2 tbsp pitted taggiasca olives
2 tbsp EVOO
1 tsp ground pepper

Method:
Finely chop the fennel, fennel tips and spring onion and place in a bowl. Peel the oranges using a knife, trying not to waste the fruit but taking away the white bitter outer layer. Slice the oranges, keep the juice and add to the bowl. Add capers with salt, olives, Evoo and pepper and mix well. The salad can keep for up to one day, but is best when just made.

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Buon Appetito!

Chocolate.. to the source

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It’s hard to imagine a better way to finish a meal than with chocolate. With incredibly unique characteristics it’s one of the most loved and consumed foods worldwide. At room temperature the consistency is hard and dry but it melts as soon as it touches our tongue meeting our body temperature. It can be moulded into any kind of shape and can be made to shine as a mirror. Not many foods offer such a sensorial experience, capable of creating strong desire, comparable to addiction, particularly in women (this is probably due to theobromine, caffeine and a tiny percentage of cannabinoids). It is said to improve cardiovascular health thanks to the presence of flavonoids and has become a symbol of romance, thought to be a great aphrodisiac… There is no doubt – eating chocolate is indeed a pleasure linked to senses.

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The cocoa tree, that grows more or less between the 10° north parallel and the 10° south parallel, evolved in Southern America’s equatorial valleys. The Aztecs and the Mayas were possibly the first to try it, consuming it as a bitter drink with the addition of spices. It was the Spaniards that first paired it with sugar and eliminated most of the spices, bringing this exotic new food back to Europe in the 16th century. It remained a luxurious and uncommon drink until the 1800, when a series of innovations (mostly Swiss) contributed to the creation of chocolate as we know it today – produced industrially and accessible for all.

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Nowadays cocoa is produced in West Africa and Asia as well as in Central and South America. Farmers are mostly small – less then 3 hectare properties – but transformers are huge; main players are in Holland, Germany and the US. Most of the cocoa produced worldwide is treated as a commodity and bought by the biggest industrial brands.

img_3866Nonetheless lately specialty chocolatiers that buy the cocoa directly from producers have grown in numbers, buying either the dried beans or the final product. In some cases the farmers are also the transformers. Basically when the beans are mature you extract the seed, ferment it, dry it and finally roast it. These must then be ground, conched and tempered before being moulded into bars, a long process that requires expertise and attention to detail to guarantee a top quality final product.

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More and more, small chocolate processers around the world are starting to treat cocoa just like you would wine, searching for specific varietals, appreciating the origin as well as the steps of production. Nothing is added except for cocoa and sugar. This gave birth to a completely new way of tasting and consuming chocolate, for example paired with wine and distilled liquors or used for cooking, to appreciate all its flavors and aromas.

We have two great bean to bar chocolate makers in Atlanta, Cacao Atlanta www.cacaoatlanta.com and XOCOLATL www.xocolatlchocolate.com. Check them out and indulge in pure ethically sourced chocolate this Valentine’s day!

 

 

Sausage and Kale Calamarata

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Cavolo nero also known as lacinato kale is originally from Tuscany. Usually recognized for being the main ingredient in the popular Ribollita soup, it pairs beautifully with fresh sausage in this pasta dish. You can switch the cavolo nero with any kind of kale or rupini, and use any shape of short pasta. Calamarata is a shorter variant of paccheri, the name recalls the similarity in shape to fried calamari… but has nothing to do with seafood!

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Watch the recipe video: https://youtu.be/aQU8zxvSNCU

Recipe for 4
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 30 minutes

Ingredients
1 500g pack Calamarata dried pasta
Sea salt, 2 tablespoons
For the sauce
Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), 3 tablespoons
Garlic clove, 2
Chili flakes, 1 teaspoon
Yellow onion, 1 large
Splash of white wine
Sausages, 2
Cavolo nero (lacinato kale), ¾ lb
Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, 4 tablespoons
Salt to taste

Utensils needed
Large pot
Pan
Pasta Strainer

Method
Fill the pot with 1.5 gallons of water and bring to a boil. In the meanwhile start making the sauce: peel the garlic and dice the onion. Heat the pan and add a tablespoon of EVOO, chili flakes and 2 garlic cloves. When it starts to sizzle add the onions, once they starts browning add the wine and let evaporate. Slice the sausage links in half lengthwise and peel off the casing, add to the pan, mix and cook for about 10 minutes. Chop the kale into strips and add to the sauce, stir it in, slightly lower the flame and cook for another 10 minutes. If in need of moisture add a few tablespoons of hot water from the large pot.
At this point while the sauce cooks through the water should be boiling. Add 2 tablespoons of sea salt and pour the pasta in, keep stirring so that it doesn’t stick. Cook for the suggested time on pack, but our suggestion is to always try one noodle before draining, you want to cook it ‘al dente’. Dente means “tooth” in Italian, it suggests that the texture must be firm and have a bite to it. After you cook pasta regularly, you will just know when it is ready.
Once pasta is ready, drain but keep about 3 tablespoons of cooking water. Add pasta and cooking water to the sauce and stir at high flame for a few minutes.
Drizzle with the remaining EVOO and garnish with shaved Parmigiano Reggiano cheese.

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Buon apettito!